Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 19-05-2009, 07:37 PM   #1   [permalink]
OtakuMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: 19 May 2009
Posts: 4
An OtakuMan Appears

I am OtakuMan!

I am 26 years old, and have aspirations to become an OTA-KING!

I have studied anime and manga through extensive exposure and reading the works of scholars such as Fredrick L. Schodt, Fred Patten, Gilles Poitras, and Helen McCarthy. With any luck, I will be as well-learned in anime and manga as they are.

I have been an Otaku since I was in Junior High, and have been learning more and more each day. I tend to look back and not forward when seeking exposure to more anime and manga. I seek out gems of the past to understand manga and anime's roots; where it is going; and what new trends and features will make up the future of anime and manga.

In my personal life, I am married, no kids, unemployed and looking for work, and enjoy video games (especially looking forward to Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom which was announced yesterday as having a North American release!)

That's it for now.

~Otaku-Man
OtakuMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-05-2009, 11:11 PM   #2   [permalink]
Seifer_fan
Senior Member
 
Seifer_fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10 Apr 2009
Location: ???
Posts: 154
weird..... wat is an otaku
__________________
"Don't forget to bring a towel."
Seifer_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2009, 02:07 AM   #3   [permalink]
OtakuMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: 19 May 2009
Posts: 4
...what?

Originally Posted by Seifer_fan View Post
weird..... wat is an otaku
You're kidding, right?

You've never heard the word Otaku before...

...ever...

...at all?

REALLY?!

~Otaku-MAn
OtakuMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2009, 02:02 PM   #4   [permalink]
Seifer_fan
Senior Member
 
Seifer_fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10 Apr 2009
Location: ???
Posts: 154
no i haven't, i am kinda new to this stuff...
__________________
"Don't forget to bring a towel."
Seifer_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2009, 11:54 AM   #5   [permalink]
cool2burn
Forum Master
 
cool2burn's Avatar
 
Join Date: 14 Jan 2001
Location: Yokosuka, Japan
Posts: 2,253
Send a message via ICQ to cool2burn Send a message via AIM to cool2burn Send a message via Yahoo to cool2burn
Otaku (おたく/オタク?) is a Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests, particularly anime, manga, and video games

Otaku is derived from a Japanese term for another's house or family (お宅, otaku) that is also used as an honorific second-person pronoun. The modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく) or katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク), or rarely in rōmaji, appeared in the 1980s. In the anime Macross, first aired in 1982, the term was used by Lynn Minmay as an honorific term. It appears to have been coined by the humorist and essayist Akio Nakamori in his 1983 series An Investigation of "Otaku" (『おたく』の研究, "Otaku" no Kenkyū?), printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko. Animators like Haruhiko Mikimoto and Shōji Kawamori used the term among themselves as an honorific second-person pronoun since the late 1970s.

In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku refers to a fan of any particular theme, topic, or hobby. Common uses are anime otaku (a fan of anime ), cosplay otaku and manga otaku (a fan of Japanese comic books), pasokon otaku (personal computer geeks), gēmu otaku (playing video games), and wota (pronounced 'ota', previously referred to as "idol otaku") that are extreme fans of idols, heavily promoted singing girls. There are also tetsudō otaku or denshamania (railfans) or gunji otaku (military geeks).

While these are the most common uses, the word can be applied to anything (music otaku, martial arts otaku, cooking otaku, etc).

The loan-words maniakku or mania (from the English "maniac" and "mania") are sometimes used in relation to specialist hobbies and interests. They can indicate someone with otaku leanings, (for example- Gundam Mania would describe a person who is very interested in the anime series Gundam). They can also describe the focus of such interests (a maniakku gēmu would be a particularly underground or eccentric game appealing primarily to otaku). The nuance of maniakku in Japanese is softer and less likely to cause offense than otaku.

Some of Japan's otaku use the term to describe themselves and their friends semi-humorously, accepting their position as fans, and some even use the term proudly, attempting to reclaim it from its negative connotations. In general colloquial usage however, most Japanese would consider it undesirable to be described in a serious fashion as "otaku"; many even consider it to be a genuine insult.

An interesting modern look into the otaku culture has surfaced with an allegedly true story surfacing on the largest internet bulletin board 2channel: "Densha Otoko" or "Train Man", a love story about a geek and a beautiful woman who meet on a train. The story has enjoyed a compilation in novel form, several comic book adaptations, a movie released in June 2005, a theme song Love Parade for this movie by a popular Japanese band named Orange Range and a television series that aired on Fuji TV from June to September 2005. The drama has become another hot topic in Japan, and the novel, film and television series give a closer look into the otaku culture. In Japan its popularity and positive portrayal of the main character has helped to reduce negative stereotypes about otaku, and increase the acceptability of some otaku hobbies.

A subset of otaku are the Akiba-kei, men who spend a lot of time in Akihabara in Tokyo and who are mainly obsessive about anime, idols and games. Sometimes the term is used to describe something pertaining to the subculture that surrounds anime, idols and games in Japan. This subculture places an emphasis on certain services (see fanservice) and has its own system for judgment of anime, dating simulations and/or role-playing games and some manga (often dōjinshi) based upon the level of fanservice in the work. Another popular criterion — how ideal the female protagonist of the show is — is often characterized by a level of stylized cuteness and child-like behavior (see moe). In addition, this subculture places great emphasis on knowledge of individual key animators and directors and of minute details within works. The international subculture is influenced by the Japanese one, but differs in many areas often based upon region. (See also: Superflat, Hiroki Azuma.)

On the matter, in recent years "idol otaku" are naming themselves simply as Wota (ヲタ?) as a way to differentiate from traditional otaku. The word was derived by dropping the last mora, leaving ota (オタ?) and then replacing o (オ?) with the identically sounding character wo (ヲ?), leaving the pronunciation unchanged.

In Japan, anime is not as widely accepted and mainstream as manga. Because of this the otaku subculture has much influence over the mainstream anime industry in Japan. The area where otaku have the most influence in manga tends to be with dōjinshi. Manga published in the United States are more influenced by their respective otaku subculture than they are in Japan. This is because most people who read manga have some ties to the subculture in the US, whereas in Japan manga reading is more widespread.[citation needed]

When otaku are studied, female otaku are largely ignored

In English and internationally
The term is a loanword from the Japanese language. In English, it is usually used to refer to an obsessive fan of anime/manga and/or Japanese culture generally, and to a lesser extent Japanese video games.

The term serves as a label similar to Trekkie or fanboy. However, use of the label can be a source of contention among some anime fans, particularly those who are aware of the negative connotations the term has in Japan. Unpleasant stereotypes about otaku prevail in worldwide fan communities, and some anime fans express concern about the effect these more extreme fans can have on the reputation of their hobby (not unlike sentiments in the comic book and science fiction fandoms).

It should be noted that the English term geek is not a precise translation of the Japanese otaku. In the original Japanese usage otaku has a significantly more negative connotation than geek does in the West, especially as the term geek has become more neutral and less derogatory in usage. The term otaku in Japanese usage generally suggests a creepy, obsessive loner who rarely leaves the house.

Whilst in English geek can suggest a person who may be socially awkward but who is also intelligent and may be fairly "normal" aside from their interest in certain typically 'geekish' pursuits (video games, comic books, computers, etc.), otaku is closer in connotation to the English nerd, but the closest English-language analogue to otaku is probably the British English term anorak. Both of these English-language terms have more emphatically negative connotations of poor social skills and obsessive interest in a topic that seems strange, niche or boring to others.

While otaku in English-speaking contexts is generally understood to mean geek or even fan, this usage is not widely known in Japan and hence casual use of the term may confuse or offend native Japanese speakers if used towards them, and self-identification as an otaku may seem strange.

To indicate that one is talking about the Japanese definition rather than the English loanword, the spelling wotaku (ヲタク) is sometimes used. On Japanese forums such as 2channel, however, otaku (オタク) and wotaku (ヲタク) are used interchangeably, depending on the mood and personal style of the poster.

The term was popularized by William Gibson's 1996 novel Idoru, which has several references to otaku.

“ The otaku, the passionate obsessive, the information age's embodiment of the connoisseur, more concerned with the accumulation of data than of objects, seems a natural crossover figure in today's interface of British and Japanese cultures. I see it in the eyes of the Portobello dealers, and in the eyes of the Japanese collectors: a perfectly calm train-spotter frenzy, murderous and sublime. Understanding otaku -hood, I think, is one of the keys to understanding the culture of the web. There is something profoundly post-national about it, extra-geographic. We are all curators, in the post-modern world, whether we want to be or not. ”
— William Gibson, April 2001 edition of The Observer

The current Prime Minister of Japan, Taro Aso is an otaku.
__________________
Kill the Spiders to save the butterflies..............
But by doing this one does not realize that they become the spider.......

http://www.willworkformunchies.com/i...yStarDance.gif

Last edited by cool2burn; 21-05-2009 at 11:55 AM.
cool2burn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-05-2009, 09:14 PM   #6   [permalink]
Kawaii Miko
Ex Moderator V.I.P.
 
Kawaii Miko's Avatar
 
Join Date: 6 Nov 2000
Location: Aden, Aria Server, Lineage II, Laptop, Boudoir, Shidonii, Oosutaraiya
Posts: 4,558
Send a message via ICQ to Kawaii Miko Send a message via AIM to Kawaii Miko Send a message via Yahoo to Kawaii Miko
Welcome to the boards
__________________
...NYA! :3
Kawaii Miko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-05-2009, 09:30 AM   #7   [permalink]
Seifer_fan
Senior Member
 
Seifer_fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10 Apr 2009
Location: ???
Posts: 154
holy crap.........
Quote:
Otaku (おたく/オタク?) is a Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests, particularly anime, manga, and video games

Otaku is derived from a Japanese term for another's house or family (お宅, otaku) that is also used as an honorific second-person pronoun. The modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく) or katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク), or rarely in rōmaji, appeared in the 1980s. In the anime Macross, first aired in 1982, the term was used by Lynn Minmay as an honorific term. It appears to have been coined by the humorist and essayist Akio Nakamori in his 1983 series An Investigation of "Otaku" (『おたく』の研究, "Otaku" no Kenkyū?), printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko. Animators like Haruhiko Mikimoto and Shōji Kawamori used the term among themselves as an honorific second-person pronoun since the late 1970s.

In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku refers to a fan of any particular theme, topic, or hobby. Common uses are anime otaku (a fan of anime ), cosplay otaku and manga otaku (a fan of Japanese comic books), pasokon otaku (personal computer geeks), gēmu otaku (playing video games), and wota (pronounced 'ota', previously referred to as "idol otaku") that are extreme fans of idols, heavily promoted singing girls. There are also tetsudō otaku or denshamania (railfans) or gunji otaku (military geeks).

While these are the most common uses, the word can be applied to anything (music otaku, martial arts otaku, cooking otaku, etc).

The loan-words maniakku or mania (from the English "maniac" and "mania") are sometimes used in relation to specialist hobbies and interests. They can indicate someone with otaku leanings, (for example- Gundam Mania would describe a person who is very interested in the anime series Gundam). They can also describe the focus of such interests (a maniakku gēmu would be a particularly underground or eccentric game appealing primarily to otaku). The nuance of maniakku in Japanese is softer and less likely to cause offense than otaku.

Some of Japan's otaku use the term to describe themselves and their friends semi-humorously, accepting their position as fans, and some even use the term proudly, attempting to reclaim it from its negative connotations. In general colloquial usage however, most Japanese would consider it undesirable to be described in a serious fashion as "otaku"; many even consider it to be a genuine insult.

An interesting modern look into the otaku culture has surfaced with an allegedly true story surfacing on the largest internet bulletin board 2channel: "Densha Otoko" or "Train Man", a love story about a geek and a beautiful woman who meet on a train. The story has enjoyed a compilation in novel form, several comic book adaptations, a movie released in June 2005, a theme song Love Parade for this movie by a popular Japanese band named Orange Range and a television series that aired on Fuji TV from June to September 2005. The drama has become another hot topic in Japan, and the novel, film and television series give a closer look into the otaku culture. In Japan its popularity and positive portrayal of the main character has helped to reduce negative stereotypes about otaku, and increase the acceptability of some otaku hobbies.

A subset of otaku are the Akiba-kei, men who spend a lot of time in Akihabara in Tokyo and who are mainly obsessive about anime, idols and games. Sometimes the term is used to describe something pertaining to the subculture that surrounds anime, idols and games in Japan. This subculture places an emphasis on certain services (see fanservice) and has its own system for judgment of anime, dating simulations and/or role-playing games and some manga (often dōjinshi) based upon the level of fanservice in the work. Another popular criterion — how ideal the female protagonist of the show is — is often characterized by a level of stylized cuteness and child-like behavior (see moe). In addition, this subculture places great emphasis on knowledge of individual key animators and directors and of minute details within works. The international subculture is influenced by the Japanese one, but differs in many areas often based upon region. (See also: Superflat, Hiroki Azuma.)

On the matter, in recent years "idol otaku" are naming themselves simply as Wota (ヲタ?) as a way to differentiate from traditional otaku. The word was derived by dropping the last mora, leaving ota (オタ?) and then replacing o (オ?) with the identically sounding character wo (ヲ?), leaving the pronunciation unchanged.

In Japan, anime is not as widely accepted and mainstream as manga. Because of this the otaku subculture has much influence over the mainstream anime industry in Japan. The area where otaku have the most influence in manga tends to be with dōjinshi. Manga published in the United States are more influenced by their respective otaku subculture than they are in Japan. This is because most people who read manga have some ties to the subculture in the US, whereas in Japan manga reading is more widespread.[citation needed]

When otaku are studied, female otaku are largely ignored

In English and internationally
The term is a loanword from the Japanese language. In English, it is usually used to refer to an obsessive fan of anime/manga and/or Japanese culture generally, and to a lesser extent Japanese video games.

The term serves as a label similar to Trekkie or fanboy. However, use of the label can be a source of contention among some anime fans, particularly those who are aware of the negative connotations the term has in Japan. Unpleasant stereotypes about otaku prevail in worldwide fan communities, and some anime fans express concern about the effect these more extreme fans can have on the reputation of their hobby (not unlike sentiments in the comic book and science fiction fandoms).

It should be noted that the English term geek is not a precise translation of the Japanese otaku. In the original Japanese usage otaku has a significantly more negative connotation than geek does in the West, especially as the term geek has become more neutral and less derogatory in usage. The term otaku in Japanese usage generally suggests a creepy, obsessive loner who rarely leaves the house.

Whilst in English geek can suggest a person who may be socially awkward but who is also intelligent and may be fairly "normal" aside from their interest in certain typically 'geekish' pursuits (video games, comic books, computers, etc.), otaku is closer in connotation to the English nerd, but the closest English-language analogue to otaku is probably the British English term anorak. Both of these English-language terms have more emphatically negative connotations of poor social skills and obsessive interest in a topic that seems strange, niche or boring to others.

While otaku in English-speaking contexts is generally understood to mean geek or even fan, this usage is not widely known in Japan and hence casual use of the term may confuse or offend native Japanese speakers if used towards them, and self-identification as an otaku may seem strange.

To indicate that one is talking about the Japanese definition rather than the English loanword, the spelling wotaku (ヲタク) is sometimes used. On Japanese forums such as 2channel, however, otaku (オタク) and wotaku (ヲタク) are used interchangeably, depending on the mood and personal style of the poster.

The term was popularized by William Gibson's 1996 novel Idoru, which has several references to otaku.

“ The otaku, the passionate obsessive, the information age's embodiment of the connoisseur, more concerned with the accumulation of data than of objects, seems a natural crossover figure in today's interface of British and Japanese cultures. I see it in the eyes of the Portobello dealers, and in the eyes of the Japanese collectors: a perfectly calm train-spotter frenzy, murderous and sublime. Understanding otaku -hood, I think, is one of the keys to understanding the culture of the web. There is something profoundly post-national about it, extra-geographic. We are all curators, in the post-modern world, whether we want to be or not. ”
— William Gibson, April 2001 edition of The Observer
that must have taken a while type up......
__________________
"Don't forget to bring a towel."
Seifer_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-05-2009, 01:44 AM   #8   [permalink]
cool2burn
Forum Master
 
cool2burn's Avatar
 
Join Date: 14 Jan 2001
Location: Yokosuka, Japan
Posts: 2,253
Send a message via ICQ to cool2burn Send a message via AIM to cool2burn Send a message via Yahoo to cool2burn
Originally Posted by Seifer_fan View Post
holy crap......... that must have taken a while type up......
Lol completely stolen from Wiki Cut and Paste !
__________________
Kill the Spiders to save the butterflies..............
But by doing this one does not realize that they become the spider.......

http://www.willworkformunchies.com/i...yStarDance.gif
cool2burn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-05-2009, 09:32 AM   #9   [permalink]
Seifer_fan
Senior Member
 
Seifer_fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10 Apr 2009
Location: ???
Posts: 154
you little cheater, you are..... just totally stole my thunder
__________________
"Don't forget to bring a towel."
Seifer_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2009, 09:15 AM   #10   [permalink]
Tsunami-X
Forum Elite
 
Tsunami-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: 27 Oct 2000
Location: Melbourne, Florida, not Aus.
Posts: 1,707
Send a message via AIM to Tsunami-X
lol. Welcome ota-KING!
__________________
No Yamcha for the Cabbit!!!!

Tsunami-X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2009, 05:06 PM   #11   [permalink]
Seifer_fan
Senior Member
 
Seifer_fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10 Apr 2009
Location: ???
Posts: 154
yep, welcome to da boards....
__________________
"Don't forget to bring a towel."
Seifer_fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[Animenewsnetwork.com] Shangri-La Opening Footage Appears Online News Hound Anime News & Reviews 0 01-04-2009 04:50 AM
[Animenewsnetwork.com] Obama Appears in Tonari no TarÅ?-kun Erotic Manga News Hound Anime News & Reviews 0 12-03-2009 04:53 PM
Evangelion Appears in Hollywood with Robin WILLIAMS~! Kyrakasa Evangelion Chit Chat 29 24-06-2003 10:27 AM
My Chibi Royal Rumble! Mikaru Anime Fan Fiction 2 27-11-2001 10:00 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.