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Old 27-06-2006, 01:01 AM   #16   [permalink]
WolfCoder
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But we all know 50 dollar pretzels, rising media piracy growing, Sony invading privacy, cheap ass anime at Wal Mart, all have one thing in common:

Who hasn't pirated anything? It's quite safe to say that almost everyone with a comp has an illegal version of software, downloaded videos, roms/isos, or commited some other random technological piracy crime.
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Old 06-07-2006, 03:32 AM   #17   [permalink]
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i am very lucky i live near a market where there sell anime for 5$
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Old 10-07-2006, 03:27 AM   #18   [permalink]
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Originally Posted by BigShot Jordan
i have so many people come and ask me why anime is so expensive.i thought some of you questioned this also so i decided to do some research to come up with an answer.
here is my long long answer,please try to read it all.


There are actually two schools on this one. There are those fans who think that we should be grateful to be able to obtain anime without having to pay import prices, and then there are fans that believe that anime in the US is largely too expensive. By ratio, anime in the US is roughly the same price it is in Japan. We may find $30 expensive for a single anime VHS tape here in the US, but in Japan, a copy of Ghost in the Shell on VHS, new, can cost as much as $150 depending on the version you buy! Feature length anime movies on VHS in Japan rarely cost less than $50. A copy of the Utena movie on VHS or DVD costs roughly $88 in Japan, and a copy of the Nadesico movie on LD or VHS in Japan costs roughly $100! When AnimeNation charges $29.95 for an import anime soundtrack CD or J-pop CD, it`s because you`d pay roughly $25 or more for that same CD if you were to fly to Japan yourself and buy it in any Japanese record store. From one perspective, it`s a lot nicer to be able to buy Blue Submarine No. 6 episodes on DVD in the US for $20 per 30 minute disc as opposed to the Japanese retail of roughly $50 each per 30 minute DVD. The upcoming American DVD edition of Tenamonya Voyagers will contain all four episodes on a single DVD for $30. At any retail store in Japan, those four episodes are available on four separate DVDs that cost roughly $60 each!

Anime is expensive in the US because translating companies have to cover the costs of licensing shows, then translating packaging, marketing and distributing them. To lower production costs, companies have to produce in massive bulk quantities, which anime simply can`t do. To us anime fans, anime may seem as though it`s a gigantic powerhouse in the US now, but a single American mainstream studio release like Mission: Impossible 2 can generate more revenue by itself than the entire American anime industry can earn in a year. Anime simply doesn`t have the big financial backing or mass market necessary to allow for lower prices.

On the other hand, I personally do believe that it is reasonable to question the expense of anime in the US. Without mentioning names, there seems to be an odd discrepancy between US anime distributors. Slayers and Irresponsible Captain Tylor, for example, can sell for $20 with four subtitled or dubbed episodes while Evangelion retails at $30 for two subtitled episodes. Early tapes of Brain Powered contain two episodes and retail for $25 each while later volumes of the same series contain seven episodes for only $5 more. Japanese contracts may have something to do with this. I don`t know enough about the American industry to say that licensing contracts don`t mandate minimum retail prices. There are many anime titles that have not yet appeared on DVD in the US yet because the American licensee may be contractually obligated to with-hold an American DVD version until the title is released on DVD in Japan first to guard against video piracy and Japanese people importing cheaper American copies rather than buying Japanese versions. American anime companies may also be obligated to pay royalties or continuing licensing fees on titles. At the same time, though, it does seem odd that Anime Village titles cost the same as other company`s titles when Anime Village/Bandai releases titles Bandai already owns the distribution rights to. The same applies to Viz`s retail prices for series like Ranma and Maison Ikkoku, both of which are titles owned by Shogakukan Publishing, Viz`s parent company.

-Bigshot Jordan-





see you space cowboys.
Don't forget that they use a large amount of papers to draw these animation as well as taking a large amount of time drawing them....the artists are the ones who should make a lot of money.....
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Old 10-07-2006, 09:00 AM   #19   [permalink]
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Best case of thread necromancy ever!

Anyway the price of a US anime DVD is still signicantly cheaper than the prices in Japan, not even taking into account that all but series like Naruto or Bleach still conform to a two episodes per disc policy these days, yikes! At around US$50 a disc for a 26 ep series that gets very expensive very quickly...

Japan don't get any relief with low budget box sets either. In fact going by the product listings at cdjapan when and if anime series ever get released in box sets it comes out at prices equal to or more than the original single disc releases because it come in a new designed box with a sticker! *phew*

This the price within the US is comparable with a feature film.. 75-100mins of anime for US$30 vs US$30 for a new release feature film, well that almost parity right there.

Similar pricing seen in AUS with anime discs reflecting the price of a feature film DVD so its all much of a muchness here.
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Old 10-07-2006, 01:53 PM   #20   [permalink]
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I guess there are many reasons but the two that come to mind are piracy, as more dvds are pirated the cost for the original anime goes up to make-up for lost sales. The other one would probably be the anime companies just raise up the prices on the anime thus this is where piracy comes in.... It's all one continuous cycle.
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Old 10-03-2007, 07:00 AM   #21   [permalink]
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Woah, this thread went on for a while. Wicked! I'm bacK!
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:42 PM   #22   [permalink]
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Originally Posted by BigShot Jordan
Wicked! I'm bacK!
And you are?
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Old 11-03-2007, 04:31 AM   #23   [permalink]
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God, has it been 7 years already? How the market has changed in so short a time. I remember when it seemed hopeless to wait for NGE to make it to release. Nowadays, an anime can't show a pair of panties without getting licensed, poorly dubbed and thrown into the nearest EB store as one of those boxsets with only disc #1 in it.
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Old 11-03-2007, 01:16 PM   #24   [permalink]
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Actually you can get pretty decent prices nowdays with Best Buy and Netflix.
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Old 12-03-2007, 02:13 AM   #25   [permalink]
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Yeah, things have really changed since like, what, 2000-2001? I remember when anime boxsets used to be hundreds of dollars. Now I can get something like the entire Escaflowne series for under $50.
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Old 12-03-2007, 03:55 AM   #26   [permalink]
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I think the market has finally caught up to the pioneering otakus that created the underground basis for fan subbing. The profit margins and realization finally hit a level that made the production companies actually try to be more competitive and aggressive in our present internet/mail order age. No longer can the major companies sit on their heels on material when there is the internet, asian knockoffs, cable anime networks, and what amounts to open code dvds.

What amazes me is why it has taken so long for this to occur ... you would think that an aggressive and shrewd anime production firm would see the steady trend in popularity and take steps to optimize its distribution to the much larger U.S and global markets. Really, when you think on it, it would be more efficient and profitable in the long run for the japanese production firm to work with true multilingual voice actors and or language specific voice actors for their primary markets. The goal being nearly simultaneously released multilingual anime episodes that cater to the profitable demographic regions by language.

... add to this, an actual reasonable price for the anime and you have what amounts to honest profits due to the minimization of pirating, bootlegging, fansubbing etc.

... but (sigh) I realize that this a "Wallgreens" fantasy ... its too logical and reasonable to be expected to actually work in the real world ... how sad.

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Old 12-03-2007, 05:07 PM   #27   [permalink]
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I don't know if things have changed or not, but I think most anime aren't made with a Western (or world) audience in mind. From most interviews I've read, a lot of Japanese companies make their work specifically for Japanese audiences.
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Old 12-03-2007, 07:04 PM   #28   [permalink]
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Originally Posted by BigShot Jordan
I don't know if things have changed or not, but I think most anime aren't made with a Western (or world) audience in mind. From most interviews I've read, a lot of Japanese companies make their work specifically for Japanese audiences.
That makes sense, but the very fact that these same companies are beginning to respond to the global market means that they are beginning to realize the implications of their product ... at the very least, this tells me that

1. they want the market (world wide profits dwarf local revenues)
2. they seem to want a greater share by the changes in how they market the amime (or how they allow it to be marketed)
3. much of the local anime produced have very obvious ties to financial limitations in the form of outsourcing and the problematic nature of a series survival based upon internal ratings of the show ...

Sam
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Old 13-03-2007, 01:53 AM   #29   [permalink]
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You raise some good points.

Interaction between Japanese and American companies has been going on for quite a while. For instance, the first Ghost in the Shell movie was partially funded by Manga Entertainment. ADV films has also sponsored numerous productions, though the results have been mostly a mixed bag (there are some great shows like Kino's Journey, but also equally awful ones like Tekken).

I think the best example of a market shift in focus is the last Vampire Hunter D movie that came out around 2000-2001. The production was largely coordinated between Japanese and American companies. The English voices were even completed before the Japanese ones, and thus the international theatrical release was exclusively english dubbed (I can only imagine how awkward it was for Japanese audiences to watch a Japanese production with English voices and Japanese subtitles). The film, like Ghost in the Shell, was a larger success in the US than in Japan (though probably on DVD rather than in theaters, because of the limited release).

Hell, even the creators of Cowboy Bebop have been tempted to make more because of its success on Adult Swim.

While anime is more popular in Japan than ever before, it would be foolish for Japanese producers to ignore the incredibly high popularity anime has in the US.
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Old 13-03-2007, 05:07 PM   #30   [permalink]
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Personally I wish they'd hire a few of these fansubbing groups and get them on the job. Their subtitles are always far superior to the professional ones. They explain linguistic jokes, backstory etc on the go. They also have titles translated and out there within days of Japanese release.

One thing I do not want to see, is english dubbing becoming more the norm. Someone like Sam probably can't appreciate it due to his bilingual(?) nature, but someone like me finds it immensely more enjoyable to read anime. The reason being that voice actors are ------- crap half the time, and the other half its just too hard to disassociate proper voice acting from children's shows. Thus why pixar etc keep using normal actors for roles in their animations IMO. Who cares if they can't do much with their voice. It re-assures the audience that they're not being spoken down to, or watching a children's cartoon.

Thing on all the really high pitched, sweety voices that a lot of anime girls use. Actually being Japanese and hearing how fake that voice is would really damage immersion. Being an english speaker however, it seems natural that the sultry character has a really sultry voice, the naive character has a dumb voice, and the badass villain has a quiet, calm voice.
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